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Wood Decking

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What is Cedar Decking?


Types of Wood Decking

Decks are subjected to the elements, foot traffic, pets and other animals, plus the weight of any items that may be stored there, so they must be strong and durable. When done correctly, a deck will not only add beauty to a home, but it can also add value. When building a deck for your home or business, it is important to take time to consider the various types of wood decking to ensure your deck will not only look beautiful, but that it will be able to withstand the stress of use. The types of wood decking include pressure-treated, native hardwoods, and tropical hardwoods.

Pressure-Treated Wood

Pressure-treated woods are the most commonly used decking material today because they are economical, aesthetically pleasing, and strong. It is easy to work with and widely available. Chances are if you choose another material for the deck itself, you will still be using pressure-treated wood for the structural support, due to the fact that other options are either too weak, or too costly. Southern yellow pine is a commonly used pressure-treated wood for decking. While it still holds a good portion of the market share, it is quickly losing ground in favor of other options, likely due to the maintenance factor associated with keeping the wood in good condition. It must be cleaned and sealed on a regular basis to extend its life.

Infusing the wood with one or more water-based preservatives using a pressure chamber creates pressure-treated wood. There are a few different options for preservatives, including: Sodium Borate (SBX), Copper Azole (CA), Alkaline Copper Quat (ACQ), and Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA). CCA was removed from most residential applications in December 2003. Copper is used in the preservatives as a fungicide.

Southern yellow pine is the common pressure-treated wood because it can be treated with effective penetration without incising the wood. Incising involves making small slits on the surface of the wood to allow the preservative to penetrate deep into the layers of wood.

Native Wood Decking

The term native wood refers to lumber harvested anywhere in North America. Cedar is one of the most common native wood choices when building a deck, although to be clear it’s a softwood and not a hardwood as many of the other examples listed below are. That term “softwood” doesn’t necessarily reflect how hard the wood happens to be or how durable it is. It refers to the species from which it is taken. Cedar is a coniferous species. So, that’s what makes it a softwood. All wood taken from a coniferous species, or “evergreen” species, is referred to as softwood.

Cedar has a rich color, grain, and texture, giving it a beautiful appearance. Beyond aesthetics, it has a stability and durability that is very reliable, as well as a natural resistance to the elements. It will lay flat, remain straight, and provide a solid base for paint and other finishes. It also holds fasteners well, compared to other woods.

Tropical Hardwood Decking

The term tropical hardwood refers to lumber harvested anywhere outside of North America. Commonly used tropical hardwoods include ipe and camaru. These woods are used because of their similarities to teak, which is generally not used for decking because of the expense associated with it.

Ipe is also known as Brazilian walnut. Generally dark brown in texture with some occasion lightly color stripes, this wood is incredibly dense, and strong, and has a fine texture. Due to the density and hardness of the wood, it is more difficult to cut, which makes the installation more labor intensive. Using this wood, you can expect your deck to last at least 25 years. Some name brand products have warranties lasting up to 40 years. If you choose not to seal the wood, it will weather to a light silver or gray color, with little to no splintering. This wood is imported from Brazil and Central America.

Camaru is much like ipe. It is also a very hard wood, dense, and strong. Generally, it is an orangish-brown color, and when left unsealed will also turn silver with weathering. This wood is imported from South America.

Other tropical hardwood choices for decking include mahogany and Brazilian redwood.

The type of wood decking you choose will be based on the look you are going for, your budget, the maintenance and care you are willing to invest over the long term, and the weather conditions in your area. What works best for one person may not work best for someone else.

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Frequently Asked Questions

What are the different kinds of wood decking?
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The types of wood decking include pressure-treated, native hardwoods, and tropical hardwoods.

How can you make your deck less slippery?
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Not only can mold and mildew stain your deck, it can also cause your deck to become slippery. After you remove the mold or mildew, apply a water-repellent stain and let it dry for at least 48 hours. If you live in a rainy or humid area, you can add a mildewcide to the stain for further protection. If your deck seems especially prone to slippery areas, you can apply a marine-grade anti-slip decking product. This type of product contains sand in the paint to provide extra traction. Finally, you can apply self-adhesive strips that have a coarse grit surface to the front edges of the steps for extra grip there as well.

How can you fix warped decking?
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One of the most common wooden decking problems is warping. This usually occurs if the deck isn’t properly weather treated or if it sees a lot of harsh weather conditions. Boards that are very warped will be easy to notice because they’ll have some extreme curvature and will likely have nails popping up. Boards that are just starting to warp will be easy to spot if you get eye level with the deck. Once you spot a warped board to be replaced, use a pry bar to remove it from the deck. Use a board that is not warped to get the measurements to cut your new plank of wood. Slide the new board into place and hammer two galvanized nails into each section of the crossbeam to attach the new board to the deck.

How can I restore my deck color?
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The best way to restore color on your deck is to paint or stain it again. Choose a stain that contains either paraffin or oil to keep moisture from soaking into the wood. If you’re not going for a weathered and gray look, you should also look for a stain that has UV blockers to prevent the rays of the sun from damaging the color. Finally, if your area is subject to wood-eating bugs, choose a stain that also contains an insecticide.

How do I care and maintain my deck?
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Rot is a major issue for wood decks. If your deck is made from pressure-treated lumber rated for ground contact, it will be more resistant to rot. On the other hand, if it’s made from untreated wood, there’s a greater risk of rot. However, any wood can rot, especially if it stays wet long enough. Most rot occurs in hard-to-see places, such as the underside of stair treads and under the decking boards, so if possible crawl under your deck when you’re looking for rotten boards. If you find a board with rot that’s less than a half-inch deep, it can be left in place. However, boards with rot larger than that need to be replaced. Use a pry bar to remove the rotten boards and replace them with a pressure-treated and rot-resistant board.

How can you tell if mildew is on your deck?
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To see if the black spots on your wood deck are mildew, apply a drop of undiluted bleach to a spot. If it disappears after a few minutes, you can clean your deck with a mild cleanser and rinse it off with a solution of four parts water and one part liquid bleach.

How can I fix deck scratches?
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Most manufacturers recommend not working on the scrapes or scratches because they will blend in with the rest of the deck over time. If you have a large or noticeable scratch, other manufacturers suggest using a soldering iron to even the scratch out and let it blend in with the rest of the deck. If you have a deep scratch or heavy damage, you might need to replace the entire board.

How can you make your deck less slippery?
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Not only can mold and mildew stain your deck, it can also cause your deck to become slippery. After you remove the mold or mildew, apply a water-repellent stain and let it dry for at least 48 hours. If you live in a rainy or humid area, you can add a mildewcide to the stain for further protection. If your deck seems especially prone to slippery areas, you can apply a marine-grade anti-slip decking product. This type of product contains sand in the paint to provide extra traction. Finally, you can apply self-adhesive strips that have a coarse grit surface to the front edges of the steps for extra grip there as well.

What is pressure-treated wood?
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Pressure-treated woods are the most commonly used decking material today because they are economical, aesthetically pleasing, and strong. It is easy to work with and widely available.

How often should I stain my deck?
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Wood decking will require annual stains for the first several years to protect the material from sun exposure and moisture damage.

How can I install wood decking?
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Wood decking is usually nailed or screwed to the joists for attachment. Each product and brand has different installation instructions, so please read your manual carefully or contact our dedication customer consultants.

What are the different decking patterns?
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There are three different decking patterns you can choose when planning for a renovation: diagonal, herringbone, and horizontal.

How to Install Wood Decking

Since a new natural wood or composite deck will be a defining feature of your property, you’ve probably thought a lot about how it will impact and improve your outdoor living space. But, have you thought about the factors that will impact the location of your new deck? Learn more here!

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Wood Decking Grades and Terminology

Wood is affected by environmental elements, insects, and fungus. When building a deck, it’s important to choose a wood grade durable enough to withstand damage from these influences over time. But decks are more than something to stand on; they are an addition to your home. The wood you choose should be structurally sound, suitable for the environment you live in, and aesthetically pleasing – functional, durable, and beautiful. To understand wood grades, some background in terminology is helpful. Learn more here!

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Wood Decking from BuildDirect

Why Buy From BuildDirect?

You want to build a wood deck. Naturally, you want to build the most beautiful deck in the world but you also want one that lasts and lasts. Look to BuildDirect for our choice of top quality wood decking and exotic wood decking.

Cedar West red cedar decking is top of the line. Milled in the Pacific Northwest, our red cedar is both gorgeous and naturally weather-resistant, capable of repelling UV rays, moisture and insects. But there's a new addition to the world of wood decking and that's exotic wood decking.

Consider these gorgeous exotics from Pavilion: Ipe and Cumaru. All are simply stunning with their unique colors and grain. All are incredibly hard and naturally resistant to weather and decay.

Exotic wood decking is fast becoming a popular choice in wood decking simply because of the hardness of these woods. Many exotics score triple or more on the Janka hardness scale when compared to traditional woods. This means you'll be able to enjoy your deck for years to come - whether its cedar or exotic wood decking.

Add value to your property and don't overpay to do it. Get your wood decking or exotic wood decking from BuildDirect. Explore our great selection of wood decking and feel free to ask one of our friendly BuildDirect product specialists if you have any questions. Call us toll free at 1-877-631-2845.