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In our ongoing bathroom remodel bugdgeting series, we’ve talked a bit about the idea of setting up for a bigger budget when you’re working with a smaller one. And we’ve talked a bit about how to make that set-up something that you can be happy with in the interim, while that budget gets bigger.

Maybe as it grows, we’ve seen that it’s possible to add some more extravagant items while we’re waiting for the bigger payoff, leaving accessory-land behind us, and entering into the land of luxury. Well, we made it in the door, anyway.

But, today our budget is bigger still – three thousand simoleons! And we further delve into the items to add to a bathroom remodel which looks a bit more like the bathroom of our dreams. Take a look.

What we can see here is a bit more flesh on the bones of the remodels that came before. It’s not that the bones were unimportant, of course. With this particular approach, it was at the early planning stages that made this vision possible. And even if you started off with three G’s and didn’t build up the remodel over time (which is one of the assumptions of this series, you may have noticed), you still need that strategy in place with all of the basics; color schemes, surface durability, and how design supports real-live human activity. But, here, we can see a definite progression.

The land of luxury

As you can see, a lot of the groundwork is in place. The dual-color scheme brings out the contrast in the room. It’s a supporting canvas for a great room in general. But, a lot of items in that room are decidedly beyond just how they look – although that’s important, too. This is about luxury that goes beyond just the visual. Take the clawfoot tub for instance. This is feature that welcomes you – you with the busy life, and the stress of juggling multiple obligations.

This is about immersing yourself in warm water, and creating a space around you that makes you feel you’ve got a place to get away from all of that in your own home. The  supporting features – the contemporary sinks, the stylish new mirrors, the new lighting – all help to create a look. But, that’s a means to an end. At this level, and at any level, your bathroom remodel should support this atmosphere of peace and relaxation. Anything that doesn’t should be ripe for replacement!

New bathroom surfaces

Bathroom surfaces also balance that look-and-practicality question. For instance, new ceramic and porcelain tile is a go-to surface in bathrooms for several reasons. One, porcelain tile in particular is designed to be impervious to moisure, of which there is a lot in the average bathroom. It’s designed to be dense so as to make it inhospitable for mold, and bacteria.

But, with how things have come along in the porcelain tile industry, you can get all kinds of surface effects and layouts (the image above shows what’s called a French pattern layout …). You can get porcelain that looks like real stone, or even porcelain that looks like wood flooring. With this budget, this is a chance to bring things up to another level for all of these practical and visual considerations.

Cutting edge bathroom technology!

The great thing about living in the 21st century is that we can take advantage of industry technology that appeals to design as much as it does to plain old good  practice. In an era when we’re learning just how important fresh water is, and how to conserve it, new technology in toilets, showers, plumbing, and fixures can help us change our consumption habits, and look great while they’re doing it. And perhaps in the very near future, fewer and fewer homeowners and property managers will need this much of a budget to add these things in the future. They will be standard!

The series continues!

We’re not done yet! We will continue this bathroom remodel series next week! And the budget of course is even bigger.

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Rob Jones

Rob served as Editor-In-Chief of BuildDirect Blog: Life At Home from 2007-2016. He is a writer, Dad, content strategist, and music fan.