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CFL bulbs

Although compact fluorescent bulbs (CFLs) are affordable green technology for energy savings, these types of bulbs come with some limitations. Depending on the circumstances, light emitting diodes (LEDs) or halogens might be a better fit. As a matter of fact, LEDs are even more efficient than CFLs. With high efficiency and adaptable light, LEDS are definite crowd pleaser. Halogens are less efficient than LEDs and CFLs but work well with dimmers.

CFLs and Cold Temperatures

CFLs operate slower and have a shorter lifespan in cold outdoor areas or unheated areas in the home. Even though some models may have cold-weather ballasts, many are not designed to tolerate very cold temperatures.

Both LEDs and halogens are a better choice when it comes to colder temperatures. These bulbs are just more tolerant of colder temperatures. In colder areas, you won’t have to be changing bulbs frequently. When it comes to using CFLs, places not to put a compact fluorescent bulb are definitely cold ones.

CFLs operate slower and have a shorter lifespan in cold outdoor areas or unheated areas in the home. Even though some models may have cold-weather ballasts, many are not designed to tolerate very cold temperatures.

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Both LEDs and halogens are a better choice when it comes to colder temperatures. These bulbs are just more tolerant of colder temperatures. In colder areas, you won’t have to be changing bulbs frequently. When it comes to using CFLs, places not to put a compact fluorescent bulb are definitely cold ones.

CFL bulb stylized

Rapidly switched fixtures and CFLs

According to experts at Green Lighting, rapidly switching CFLs off and on can decrease the lifespan of the bulb up to 85 percent. Scientists claim that CFLs tolerate about 7,000 on and off cycles. As a result, places not to put a compact fluorescent bulb include back rooms and closets.

In order to maximize energy savings in these types of areas, halogens or LEDs are a savvy choice. These bulbs can manage the cycles without quickly burning out. You’ll have the benefit of energy efficiency and avoid the hassle of having to switch out the bulb frequently.

Fixtures, shock and vibration

CFLs are not only fragile, but they contain a small amount of mercury. With lighting fixtures, such as ceiling fans or those subject to shock, CFLs are often not a wise choice. Lighting applications where the fixture is likely to get banged up or incur a lot of vibration should be avoided with CFLs.

Halogens contain glass that may shatter and should also be avoided. With these types of applications, LEDs are the best bet. LEDs are solid, tough and durable. They even work well for street signage and in factories.

CFLs and dimmers

Most CFLs do not have a dimming feature. The ones that do don’t work with conventional wall dimming switches. Even the ones that have dimming ballasts don’t dim as completely as incandescent bulbs. If you prefer dimming that is smooth and complete, halogens will get the job done. Some of the newer LEDs come with dimmer switches, but aren’t as smooth as incandescents. For those who aren’t picky about perfect dimming, an LED is a good compromise.

CFLs have a definite place in green lighting technology, but you’ll reap the best rewards when placing these bulbs in the right application. Just keep in mind the places not to put a compact fluorescent bulb, and you’ll get the best results. Temperature, application, vibration, and dimming are all determining factors when choosing whether or not to use a CLF. Choose right, and you’ll have the ideal lit home.

 

 

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Cate Morgan-Harlow

Cate Morgan-Harlow is an all arounder, writing about how-to, DIY, and design with gusto. She is a shadowy figure with a mysterious past.