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If you’ve thought about getting a gas range, you’re in luck, because they’re now part of BuildDirect’s ever-expanding product line.

Gotta tell ya, my dream kitchen would have a professional gas range like those on offer. I don’t even have a “nice” gas stove but getting it with my new apartment last summer’s been the best thing to ever happen to my cooking. And I should know, I’ve written a cookbook since!

Stainless Steel Gas Range

Hyxion Freestanding Professional 4 Burner Gas Range

If you’re an enthusiast about cooking, then gas is the way to go. With flame, your control over the heat is immediate. Up, down, off, on, it’s all in the blink of an eye. This is so not the case with electric stovetops that have to “reach” the newly-chosen temperature.

From candy-making to frying eggs and trickier dishes like making risotto or searing an expensive steak, with the right cookware and a gas stove, you’ll have more quality control than an electric range could ever provide.

It’s also way more fun to get cooking, because the little “whooooosh-poof!” one hears from turning on a gas burner never, ever gets old. Look, ma! Fire! *poof!*

Efficiency? Check.

Aside from sheer fun, there are other advantages. I was blown away when it took half the time for water to boil, for instance. Why such a dramatic difference in time? Because flames lick the side of the pot when you crank it to high. Super-speedy when bringing dishes up to temperature.

And if you’re a fan of ethnic cooking, like making East Asian stir-fries of any kind, it the sort of power you’ll need for effective wok cooking! Realistically, no home can really have the power a real Asian restaurant has for wokking it up (80-125,000 BTUs!), but 15,000 BTUs is enviable in most home kitchens.

cooking stovetop

Lifestyle advantages

An accessory that  goes hand-in-hand with gas cooking is a cast iron grill. For my gas stove, I’ve bought a reversible griddle/grill plate that’s over 20” long, and it gives me a very close experience to outdoor grilling year-round, since my seaside home is far too windy for winter barbecues. Flip it over for a griddle, and weekend breakfasts have never been so good. Pancakes, fried eggs, and more, on your “flat-top.”

That wind means winter storms where I live, and I like knowing I can cook no matter what the weather is. Even with an electric ignition going on the blink in a power outage, lighting a gas burner can be done safely.

Sure, there’s a small concern every gas range owner should have, and that’s whether their cooking area is suitably ventilated. After all, you’re cooking with gas! With a good hood, or a window nearby, safe operation won’t be a concern.

It makes good cents

The final winning point on cooking with gas is the cost. My “gas used” for cooking monthly is 75% less than my “basic charge” fee for the gas. I work from home, and have written a cookbook recently, so you know I’m using my stove two or three times a day, especially since I don’t have a microwave. How much “gas used” does my gas stove ring up monthly? Under $3 for what I’m doing on my stove. If I had a family and all that, it’d obviously be more, but for economy’s sake, cooking with gas keeps the energy costs low.

Cooking at home is the most valuable skill you can have, saving you as much as 70% against restaurant prices for the same meal. Making your food is also one of the best ways to take control of your health, if you’re making the right things. If you can control the quality of your food better, plus have a little more fun doing it, while saving on energy costs… then why the heck not cook with gas?

For more information about the new (as of this writing!) range of kitchen appliances at BuildDirect, contact a BuildDirect customer service representative for more information.

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Steffani Cameron

Steffani Cameron is a Victoria BC-based writer on a variety of topics. Here on the BuildDirect blog, she specializes in writing about smaller, urban spaces. How do you make the most of your smaller space? How do you decorate it to suit you? And how do you wage the war against clutter and win? This is Steff’s specialty.