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I love the fall.

But one of the things I mourn when it comes to the passing of summer is the loss of natural light as days grow shorter and nights grow longer. As study after study has shown, the level of natural light in our spaces has a direct affect on our mood, and on our health, too. We need to feel comfortable and happy at home, right? So, by virtue of that we need more natural light too.

How do we get it, though?

Well, here’s an infographic version of a piece we published a while back about simple ways of making the most of the natural light we’ve got in a season when there’s less of it during the day. Take a look.

BuildDirect_GettingMoreLight_v1 copy

Some of these means of capturing more natural light in a space requires some energy, and budget. But, are there some other ways to get there which don’t necessarily depend on a big budget or home improvement? Of course there are!

For instance, mirrors and other reflective surfaces won’t increase the amount of natural light in a space. But, they can sure help to diffuse it more efficiently. The same goes for a change in color scheme. Pale blue, subtle shades of yellow, warm shades of orange are all ways to get that atmosphere of a bright day. It won’t boost sunlight in your room. But, it will evoke the feeling of being in a sunlit space. Sometimes, a re-arranged piece of art moved from one room to another, bringing new colors and new accents can help inject a fresh infusion of lightness.

Enhancing our positive states of mind

Basically, it comes down to this. If you’re not in a position to install a skylight, or knock a new hole in a wall,a big way to win here is the approximation of natural light. In some ways, natural light is a means to an end. What we look for in the seasons that deny us the light we love in the spring and summer is a way to enhance our positive states of mind, our feelings of well-being. That’s the goal in any home and at any time of year.

But, a shot of Vitamin D that natural light can deliver always helps!

What about your space?

What are the levels of light like in fall where you live? How do you compensate for less natural light in the fall and winter?

Tell us all about it in the comments section!

Cheers,

Rob.

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Rob Jones

Rob served as Editor-In-Chief of BuildDirect Blog: Life At Home from 2007-2016. He is a writer, Dad, content strategist, and music fan.