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So, with homeowning being way, way out of reach for many people, and with resources rapidly becoming more scarce, a solution that addresses both problems, both very pressing ones at that in the 21st century, is required. So here it is; affordable, comfortable, and aesthetically pleasing homes can be created by using sustainable building practices on a mass scale.

We’ve talked a bit about this on this blog when we’ve looked at modular homes, and how they reduce carbon footprints, and how more straightforward construction reduces overhead so as to make them more affordable .  But, recently I found an example of this model that goes one better.

Get ready for modular homes that are made from reclaimed materials!

Of course, these are homes that are tiny when compared to your average home, and a far cry from the disturbing trend toward souless (and resource hungry) McMansions.

But, take a look at this site – tinytexashouses.com – that will collect, construct, and ship to your site all you need to put together your own (little) house.

From the site:

Our clients get to pick all the pieces and parts that they want to use from out vast inventories and I design each house around those choices. This means every one is a unique piece of House Art that will last for the rest of their lives, and the next couple generations as well. [read more about reclaimed module homes from tinytexashomes.com]

Take a look at some of the interior shots on the site.  As you will see, they are pretty modest in terms of space.  Yet, I think it can be argued that what little space there is is used efficiently.

I kind of came in like thunder with the idea that one simple idea will solve all of our problems. This may or may not be true in this particular case.  Yet, I do think it’s important to consider that the re-use of materials, the affordability and comfort of decent housing for everyone, and the practice of integrating our lives into our natural world in a less violent way should really be an ongoing conversation by the powers that be, not just consumers.

Even still, another theme that’s come up in my mind, and therefore onto this blog too, is the idea that we should redefine what the concept of ‘progress’ means.  And to me, progress in our current context is most deftly summed up by how innovative products and processes are, away from the unsustainable methods of the past.

In the meantime, take a look at the tiny Texas (who would have thunk it?) homes as an example of just that, practical on a wide, mainstream scale or not.

Cheers,

Rob.

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Rob Jones

Rob served as Editor-In-Chief of BuildDirect Blog: Life At Home from 2007-2016. He is a writer, Dad, content strategist, and music fan.