Reading Time: 1 minute

The thing I find most fascinating about home renovations and commercial renovations is the intersection of history and transformation.  In other words, I love that buildings with a history can take on new life, and sometimes in unexpected ways.

Even if there is a contrast from what a building was and what it has become, there is still a sense of continuity there.  And in a more down-to-earth sense, transforming a space and leveraging the reliability of the building materials that have served those living and working there for decades is just good sense in this age of conservation.

Take a read of this article about a renovation project which transformed a funeral home into a music venue, complete with refinished hardwood floors.  I suppose the contrast between the two is what strikes me the most, which I suppose is kind of the ‘hook’ of the article.  A funeral home is about the end of life, and a music venue maybe is a little further away from that – depending on how good the music is! I suppose it could be argued that funerals and concerts can both be celebrations of life.  But, let’s not split hairs.

History and the future dont have to be mortal enemies, especially when perceptions around old spaces can be transformed by innovation and care.   Tree and office building image courtesy of Wonderlane.  Click the image to view Flickr stream.

History and the future don't have to be mortal enemies, especially when perceptions around old spaces can be transformed by innovation and care. Tree and office building image courtesy of Wonderlane. Click the image to view Flickr stream.

The point for me is that renovation projects don’t simply change the way a building looks, or even how a property can be used functionally.  Great renovation projects also change perceptions.  And this can really have an impact on communities who want to hang on to their sense of history, yet also want to bring local landmarks to life.  And great building materials which have stood the test of time can easily bring a location from death to new life.

Cheers!

Rob.

LinkedInRedditPinterest
1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
Loading...

Rob Jones

Rob served as Editor-In-Chief of BuildDirect Blog: Life At Home from 2007-2016. He is a writer, Dad, content strategist, and music fan.