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Are you considering adding marble tile to your home? For centuries, marble tiles have been a symbol of affluence, exuding sophistication and an air of artistry that make marble tile a classic choice. Before you purchase the tile, you will want to make sure you ask the right questions, as doing your research ahead of time will save you time and money. Here are some questions you should have in mind when deciding if you want to get marble tile.

Are There Fissures in the Marble?

Marble can have fissures, which are points that are naturally weak in the stone. This is often seen as a hairline crack and should be looked at carefully. Where the fissure is located depends on if you’ll be able to use it at all. If you find the fissure where the marble needs to be the strongest, such as an overhang or sink, this won’t work, as it won’t be strong enough to support weight.

The slab is more likely to break during fabrication in this case. This means the people setting the tile will have to anticipate waste and order an extra 10 to 15 percent of the product in case it cracks. Ultimately, this will end up wasting your money.

Is Marble Porous?

white-polished-12x24-room_1000Kesir Marble Tile – Polished / SKU: 10086381

Marble is more porous than other stones, which mean they have a greater chance of soaking up stains from coffee and red wine. You might want to take this into consideration if you plan on putting marble tile in an area that will have plenty of traffic with these beverages, such as a bar. You’ll also want to avoid lemons and other acidic substances, as these can etch the surface. Take into consideration that hair dye can stain a marble shower if you plan on putting it in the bathroom.

You should also note that it requires a good amount of maintenance to keep the floors looking like new. To maintain its look, the flooring should get refinished once or twice each year, and a high-quality stone sealer that’s specifically made for marble should be used. Marble is soft, which means dog claws and high heels can easily tear it up. It should not be installed in areas where people will be wearing their high heels or dogs will be running around.

How Can I Find Good Quality Tile? 

Marble tile can be expensive, but it’s worth it when you get quality tile due to how beautiful it looks. Make sure you don’t buy your marble from just anyone, though. Research reputable retainers so you know you’ll only find high-quality floor tiles. If there are any of lesser quality, they should be heavily discounted.

When you look at the tiles you want to buy, avoid any that have dull spots, have a mesh backing, or having veining that goes through the back. This means they’re not high quality and won’t look good when you install them.  Only brittle titles have meshing to hold them together, and seeing dull spots means a fill was used to cover fissures and holes. Any veining that goes through the tile means there are potential weak spots where the tile could break.

However, you shouldn’t rely on how hard marble tile is to determine if it’s of high quality or not. A tile could be hard and strong, or it could be hard because weak spots have been filled in. You want tiles that don’t have any fill.

What Types of Tile Are There?

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There are a variety of different marbles to consider depending on what look you want. Breccia marble has beautiful swirl and grain patterns that tend to look like bubbles that got trapped in the rock. It usually comes in warm, darker shades of red, gold, and tan. Another type of marble is Carrara, which is a classic type often associated with Greek and Roman statues and temples. This is a white marble that has small bands of gray in it. Carrara can often be found in architectural details, such as around fireplaces.

Calacatta marble is commonly confused with Carrara marble. While they’re similar, calacatta has a more pure white color with streaks that are bold. It’s also rare and highly sought after due to its beautiful appearance. That said, it’s also one of the more expensive marbles.

How Much Does Marble Tile Cost?

There are a variety of shapes that marble flooring comes in, from small mosaics to large rectangles. These will determine what the prices are, which can be anywhere from $5 to $50 per square foot. You should also take into account how much it will cost to hire a professional installer to help with this project. Marble floors are not for novices, as they’re challenging and tricky projects most people aren’t able to do themselves.

Professionals will also be able to cut the tiles into different patterns and create curves that might ruin the tile if you did it yourself. You can expect to pay anywhere from $15 to $50 per square foot to have someone install the marble tile.

Does Marble Tile Come in Finishes?

white_marble_giallo_12x12_polished_bathroom_595a23f719857_1000Troya Marble Tile / SKU: 10097631

There are two finishes that marble comes in: polished and honed. Polished marble has a high sheen finish that allows you to see the grain and beauty of the stone. It’s important to note that when it gets wet, the finish can be slippery and slick. This may not be the best option if you want to put marble tile in areas like bathrooms where water is present. One way to get around this problem is by using area rugs on the floor so you don’t have to worry about anyone slipping.

Honed marble does not look as sleek as polished, but it’s a more practical finish in wet rooms or high traffic areas. The surface texture is rougher and provides better traction.

There are many factors to consider when purchasing marble tile. You’ll want to make sure it makes sense to put it in the desired area and that precautions are taken if it’s placed in wet rooms, like the bathroom. While it can be expensive, it’s worth it to give a room, floor, or countertop a beautiful and elegant appearance.

 

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Resources Used:

https://www.builddirect.com/blog/how-to-choose-a-tile-floor/

https://www.builddirect.com/blog/choosing-natural-stone-tile-granite-marble-travertine/

 

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Brooke Cumming