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About Bamboo Flooring

About Bamboo Flooring

In a world increasingly concerned about the sustainability of the things we use, bamboo flooring is like a breath of fresh air. Environmentally sound, yet resilient and durable, bamboo flooring is the hardwood flooring solution for those who are looking for a beautiful floor without having to sacrifice quality, cost, or the environment.

The Durability of Bamboo Flooring

For those who find it hard to comprehend just how bamboo flooring can possibly be more durable than other types of wood, consider this: regular trees will bend and eventually crack in heavy winds and turbulent weather. Bamboo is not like regular wood; it is pliable and resilient, and bends under the same conditions that would cause other trees to break.

The Sustainability of Bamboo

While bamboo flooring is one of the hardest, most durable types of wood flooring out there, it is also one of the kindest to Mother Nature. Technically, bamboo is classified as a grass, which means that it grows at a rapid rate. The reason that the harvesting of trees is so devastating to the environment is because they take anywhere from 15 to 100 years to become fully mature. Bamboo can be harvested every five to seven years, making it a more economically and environmentally sound solution for beautiful hardwood flooring.

Unlimited Options

Contrary to popular belief, bamboo flooring is available in just as many colors, grains and styles as traditional hardwood floors, if not more. Bamboo can give your décor any of the looks you are going for, from the classic down-home feel to the contemporary, chic effect that so many are looking for today.

Don’t limit yourself with traditional wood flooring. Sustainable, environmentally-friendly products are better for the earth. And for those who want to stay on trend while making a positive impact, bamboo flooring is the perfect solution. When it comes to durability, style, and sustainability, bamboo is an obvious choice.

Check Out These Resources

Before you make any purchasing decision that will last as long as a bamboo floor can, it makes sense to learn as much as you can about the product you are considering buying.

Is Bamboo Right For Me? – Determine whether or not bamboo is the best choice for your project.

Why Should You Switch to Bamboo? – Whether you are looking for a sustainable solution, or an ecellent price, there are many reasons to switch to bamboo.

How Bamboo Flooring Is Made – Know what is involved in making this sustainable flooring option.

Types of Bamboo Flooring – Learn about the different types of bamboo: horizontal, vertical, strand-woven and more.

Bamboo Flooring Buying Guide – Learn what questions you need to ask in order to make an informed bamboo flooring purchase decision.

Bamboo Cleaning & Care – Find out how easy it is to care for a bamboo floor.

Bamboo Flooring Dos and Don’ts – Here are some things to consider when shopping for bamboo floors.

How to Install a Bamboo Floor – Decide if you’re up to the task of installing a bamboo floor yourself.

FAQs – Find answers to some of the most frequently asked questions about bamboo flooring.

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(21) Comments

  1. I have been inquiring around, and i have received advice to use 60-tooth and 80-tooth carbide tipped blades. They do get quite expensive as the number of teeth goes up. I have no idea what correct information is and most available carbide blades are 40T and 60T. Even 80T is not common. I will research availability of 100T blades.

    Thank you.

  2. To best of my research from sources other than Builddirect, it seems that to cut bamboo with aluminum oxide coating will require a 100-tooth carbide fiber tipped blade. Even using that hardened a blade, two or more blades may be required for an installation. If this is not correct information, please publish a correction or insert the correct information into the installation instructions for a bamboo floating floor.

  3. Hi all, here is what I found about pet on bamboo ON this site. I don’t know why this question was being ignored when the answer was already on this site …sheez:

    Bamboo Flooring
    Bamboo is an excellent choice for homes with pets, for many different reasons. It’s harder than the hardest hardwoods, meaning it will stand up to more traffic. It won’t wear out, and it’s completely renewable, so it makes a good choice for those who are trying to be green. It is stain resistant, so people don’t have to worry about accidents or spills. Due to bamboo’s hardness it will save money compared to repairing other types of flooring. For those who are trying to decide between using hardwood and vinyl flooring, choosing bamboo floors is a great compromise.

    Read more: //learn.builddirect.com/flooring-info/animals/pets/#ixzz3AzXRt0HY

  4. Pingback: Sustainablog | Jeff McIntire-Strasburg has been blogging a greener world via sustainablog since 2003!

  5. Tom winkelspecht - Reply

    Can someone tell me if I need a underlayment on a strand woven bamboo harvest floor. We will be laying the bamboo on new construction plywood floor, over a crawl space.

    Thank you.

  6. I need to redo the flooring of my living room,, bed room and office. I have dogs, live in the country, have large windows that let a lot of light in and want to have as little maintenance as possible and will last a long time. What kind of floor do you recommend.?

  7. Just installed 1000 square feet of cali bamboo flooring. Install glue to concrete slab. We have bubbles in every room and they are leaching out this brown viscous liquid. Would like to know what is causing this and where to go to have the liquid tested.

  8. How do you put the flooring down? Is there anything extra that you have buy for installing this type of floor?

  9. We have just got installed the bamboo floor (toasted bamboo) in our apartment and in certain areas it feels like it is floating (you can see it moving up and down) when walked on it; I talked to the intaller and he said that it is normal; Is it normal? Please help me out.
    Thanks,
    Bhanu Sampat

  10. I have a 75′ foot sharp houseboat that i would like to install hardwood floor in. I have estimated it will take about 725 sq, feet of flooring. I would like to use a 1/2′ tongue & groved flooring that I can staple down to a plywood subfloor. Even though this is a houseboat moisture should not be a problem because the houseboat is airconditioned. I have seem a lot of new units with hardwood flooring installed in them. What flooring would you recommend I use?

    Regards,
    Kenn Nenson

    • Hi Andre,

      I would not recommend using any type of steam mop on a Bamboo Floor. It is best just to sweep your floor and mop with a dampened cloth with water. (A splash of vinegar will help as well) You will want to stay away from any harmful chemicals or steam mops when cleaning your floor as it could have a negative effect on the surface of the material.

      Thanks,

      Julian

    • Recommended installation method would be to nail down over a 3/4″ plywood subfloor with 1 1/2″ – 2″ nails or if you have a concrete subfloor you will need to glue down.

  11. Pingback: Is Wood Flooring Right for You

  12. Hi, I would like to redo a bathroom floor. I would like to use a wood or woodlike material. What would you recomend?

    • If you are looking at a bathroom there’s only a couple of wood look products I would recommend. One that’s become very popular in recent years is wood grain porcelain tile. It will have roughly the look and feel of wood but is totally water resistant and very durable. If the coldness of tile is an issue for you, I’d look at luxury vinyl tile. It’s easy to install, very water resistant and looks good. It’s also quite thin so it shouldn’t mess with existing fixtures and vanities. I have to redo my bathroom floor in the next couple of months and I plan to use luxury vinyl tile.

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